Invisible

Three years ago I used to think I could stand to lose a few pounds. Maybe just off my belly or hips. I wasn’t fat, not even close. I had a beautiful curvy body, with perky boobs, and (what I now realize) a great butt.
But, society pushes images of model thin women on us. Also there’s that constant reminder at the checkout line at the grocery store that we should be buying health food magazines, and basically everyone should just be a vegan hippie if you want the perfect beach bod. The need to be skinny swirls around us every day. So, back then, with societal peer pressures, I was convinced I’d be truly beautiful if I could knock off the slight muffin top thing I had going on.
Gosh, how stupid I was. I look at pictures of me then and realize how beautiful I already was. I didn’t need to change one thing about myself.

Fast forward three years and I look in the mirror to find a stranger staring back. I never knew I could look like this person invading my body. Who is she?
Three years of prednisone has caused my body to double in size. The doctors say it’s water weight, but if that’s the case then someone needs to take a needle to this balloon. This isn’t my stomach, this round thing protruding out in front of me. I look pregnant.
My breasts have tripled in size, but not in a sexy, voluptuous way. They are heavy and hang, and now I deal with breast sweat and the rash of pimples that comes along with it. Gross.
But I could deal with the fat body had I at least still looked like myself. I don’t though. My doctors call it ‘Cushingoid’, but prednisone users more commonly refer to it as having ‘Moonface’. The face in the mirror is not my own. It’s round and flat, my eyes and once beautifully defined cheekbones have become lost in the excess skin. I don’t like her. She’s ugly, and I want her gone from my life.
Three years have past since I started this journey of illness, pain, and suffering. I’ve lost so much of who I used to be. And the only thing I’ve gained is more pain and 70 pounds of “water weight”.

But you can’t see my suffering when you look at me.
You don’t see the holes in my bones that look like the bones of an 80yr old woman, and not those of a 34yr old.
You can’t see all the fractures that Osteoporosis has given me, the tiny breaks that cause monumental pain.
You see me limping or walking with my cane and figure I probably had an accident, not that this will only get worse and in a few years I’ll be in a wheelchair.

My disease is invisible.

You see all this disgusting weight and think I must over-indulge, binge eat, or just can’t say no to food. You don’t know that I fill my days with fruits and vegetables. That I’ve cut out coffee, soda, sugar, and fast food. That my life is full of dieting and exercise and yet as long as I’m on prednisone I will continue to have this round lumpy body. And that there is absolutely NOTHING I can do about it.

I move slowly because the flesh around my joints are inflamed and infected. If you took the time to look closely you could see the swelling in my knees, how fat and puffy they are. You could see that my hands seem abnormally large due to the inflammation. That my knuckles are discolored and squishy. That my feet look like football’s with more swelling.
If you took the time to see how slowly I have to move. That every step I take is calculated to ensure I don’t hurt myself. If you watch my face closely you will see the pain there that I try desperately to hide. That every single movement is like a butter knife slowly being pushed into a bone.
But most people don’t see that.

Because my disease is invisible.

People only see what they want to see.
A fat girl.
A pregnant girl.
Too lazy to walk quickly.
Using a cane for attention.

My disease is invisible.

They don’t see my reality.
The excruciating pain of my day to day life.
Wrestling with myself to do daily tasks.
Willing myself to stand up without crying out.
Not being able to dress myself on the bad days.
Needing help to shampoo my hair.
Crying in my bedroom when the pain and suffering becomes unbearable.

My disease is invisible.

I am invisible.

If you would like to help support my illness financially please feel free to make a donation:
Christine Lilley’s Life Fund
Thank you.

My disease is invisible.

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About sixthousandsteps

In March of 2013, I was diagnosed with chronic Rheumatoid Arthritis and was told my disease was very aggressive. Every day since then has been an ongoing struggle and life lesson on how to stay positive and keep fighting. This blog is a glimpse of how it all came to be, and who knows what the future holds.

Posted on December 26, 2015, in The Journey and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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