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Let’s talk about karma

I had an interesting revelation recently about karma. See, for the longest time I thought that karma wasn’t on my side because of the chronic illness I suffer from. I figured things surely weren’t going my way especially if I was in constant suffering from this terminal disease. I’d hear other people complaining about their lives and I admit that it really frustrated me. Not because they aren’t deserving of complaints, no judgments here, but because they sounded so minor in my mind to what I was feeling. And that’s of course wrong. I shouldn’t judge others lives as much as they shouldn’t judge mine. I wasn’t mad at them, I was mad at my disease. 

I guess for a long time I felt cheated by life. Cheated by the world, for having this incurable pain that I had no control over. But then I had this great epiphany a couple of weeks ago. It was just after receiving an amazing gift from a friend. I had unfortunately just cracked one of my teeth, while eating boneless chicken, no less. I was desolate because I knew I didn’t have enough money to go to the dentist, let alone go and get a root canal and a crown, which surely would’ve been the case. I was super depressed and had posted on Facebook how frustrated I was that I was too broke to go to a dentist. And amazingly an acquaintance of mine reached out through a personal message and offered to pay for a dental visit for me. 

I was floored. Having only one other time experienced such generosity, I was shocked. 

Despite my protests, my friend insisted I go to the dentist the next day, which I did. And very unhappily came to find that it was not one tooth, but two! Could the news be any worse? Yes. It would cost close to $4000 to fix my teeth. I was even more depressed by that point. So I told the dental assistant to call my friend, whom would be paying for the consultation, and he would give her a credit card over the phone. While she went off to collect her few hundred, I sat trying to comprehend how I could come up with all that money for a problem that was a pretty big issue. They were my front bottom teeth, and it wasn’t something I could ignore. Imagine my giant surprise when the dental assistant returned and told me my friend had not only paid for the consultation, but also for my two root canals AND crowns. Almost $4000 in dental surgery and reconstruction!

I was speechless. After agreeing to come back later that afternoon for the dental surgery, I contacted my friend, worried at how much money he had spent. But he was so nice! Told me he was glad to help me, having known how much I needed it. Not only did he know I would never be able to pay him back, he didn’t even ask for me to. I could not believe the generosity of someone I didn’t know that well.

That  night, as I rested at home with a swollen and numb jaw, I also remembered the generosity of another person. Someone who had read my blog and sought me out because of it. A very generous person who treated my mom and I to an amazing meal at their restaurant, just as a way to say “I care”. Two people who barely knew me, but understood my struggle, my pain, had reached out and given amazing support in ways I didn’t know could happen to people like me.

And of course I have received support in many other ways, from many other people as well. Friends who have bought me groceries when I’ve run out of food stamps, or couldnt get to the store. Friends who’ve paid my phone bill because all I could afford was rent. People who didn’t even know me and donated to my fund to help me have a home. Family members who have helped get me to the er and the doctors office. Family that took care of my cats when I was ill or away. As well as two military families that took me in after I couldn’t work anymore. And all of this done selflessly, with no expectation of payback, or strings.

I have been very very lucky.  I realize this now. All this time I thought I had bad karma because of my disease. That I was being punished for any wrong doings I’ve done in my life. No. How very wrong I was. My karma is outstanding. How else to explain why so many amazing  people do amazing things for me in my life? How else to explain what wonderful people I have around me, who dedicate themselves to supporting and loving me? If I were a bad person, people would not help me as they do. You don’t give your generosity to someone you think isn’t worthy of it. Not generosity like I’ve received. 

Silly me. Bad karma? No no no.

My karma is outstanding. What a wonderful thing to behold. And thank you to all of the people in my life who helped me realize this.

Texting Doesn’t Say I Love You 

Have you noticed how texting seems to be the only way people communicate these days? We now live in a world where we feel naked without our cellphones, and texting has become our life line with the rest of society.

 When I was 17, and in college, my mom bought me my first cellphone. I was so stoked about it, because unlike a lot of my peers, I never had a pager which was all the rage in the 90’s. I quickly became quite proficient in texting with one hand, usually by my side, unbeknownst to whichever professor was droaning on at the time. This was also around the same time that I got my first computer, and was introduced to the wonders of the internet. I’d used the web before, but having a personal computer opened up the world of chat rooms, Napster, and instant messaging, that I’d never had access to in the past. Instant Messenger, texting’s online bosom buddy, allowed me to be whomever I wanted when talking online. Without having to deal with social inadequacies and shyness, I could have long conversations with friends and strangers, and in many ways, it boosted my confidence for in person conversations as well.

18 years later, and countless cellphones and computers having come and gone, I feel like our lives have been taken over by something that once seemed so helpful. Not having to have a full conversation with someone just to ask a quick question, was made easy by text messaging. You could avoid a phone call with an awkward acquaintance by just  sending an email. But when did our lives get taken over by shortcuts?

A few weeks ago, my cellphone alarm pinged to let me know it was a close friends birthday. And without even thinking, I punched out a quick “Happy Bday” text to the person, followed by a post on their Facebook page. It wasn’t until I had finished that I realised how very impersonal of a gesture that was. This was one of my closest friends, and all I was doing was sending a text? And it’s not like I didn’t have the time to call…. I’m disabled, living and working at home, all I have is time… I started to scroll through my contacts to call her and wish her happy birthday like a decent person should, but then I stopped. I remembered that they had only sent me a Facebook post on my own birthday, a few weeks prior, and hadn’t called either. It’s not this fact that stopped me from making my own call, but a thought occurred to me that maybe it just wasn’t that important to them, that maybe social media was their preferred way of contact. And so I just left it, opting to do nothing more. 

But the memory of the ordeal has lingered with me for weeks now. I am constantly reminded of scenarios that have happened in recent years where texting has not served me well. One of these circumstances was the ending of a relationship a few years ago. A boyfriend of mine and I were not getting along very well, and after a long night of texting back and forth, we ended our relationship. The very next morning I thought how preposterous it was that we would break up over text. There are no nuances in texting. You can’t see the expressions of the person you are talking to, nor hear the tone of their voice. So much can be lost in translation. And yet, we left it as is, and did not ever try to talk about it in person.

Someone once told me that you are at your most honest when you are drunk, because your inhibitions are lowered, and you speak more freely. I believe this is the same with texting and instant messaging. You aren’t looking directly at someone, so you often say a lot more than you would, because you have no audience. You can hide from rejection, or dislike, or answers you don’t want to hear, because you aren’t face to face. You can’t see the other parties expressions, and that gives you a certain amount of freedom to be who you want to be without instant repercussions.

Social media is a lot like this as well. The personal  page phenomenon brought to us by MySpace and Facebook, have allowed us to be whomever we want to be online. Sure, people see you, but it’s the You that you decide on. You control what pictures you post, you control what personal details you share, and you even decide what comments you write. You have the ability to remake yourself in a sense. Of course, those who know you well, know the truth. So you can’t get away with to many “remakes” of the reality, without getting caught out. 

I’ve often been bewildered  looking at people’s pages that post the opposites of what their  lives are really like. People who have complained of being in dead end relationships to their close friends, end up posting pictures of the perfect marriage online. Or people who are struggling with finances post pictures of themselves purchasing vacations or going on shopping sprees. Why do we do that, do you suppose? Why is it so important to us to show everyone a different reality? Why do we portray ourselves differently online or through text messaging?

And when did texting and email and social media become the only way to communicate? Are we afraid to have real conversations with people? What do we fear they will hear in our voices? The truth? Sadness? Loneliness? Our online lies?

Are we supposed to feel loved when receiving a text message asking how we are doing? Are we supposed to feel supported? This person took five seconds from their day to send me an eight word message, I guess they really care? When did we stop making the time to really check in on each other? When did we put texting and social media before our relationships with one another?

And where will we be in another eighteen years? Will conversations be completely redundant by then? I don’t think I want to know.

Marking Time

I often find myself thinking a lot about time. Not time in the sense of watches and clocks, but more as how it relates to me, and how it passes. For someone with an illness or a disease, time can mean a lot of different things. Time can mark minutes til your next medication feeding, days until another doctors appointment, weeks between ER visits, or years left on your life clock. I’ve been thinking about how precious my time is. And how limited it can truly be.

I marvel at how my time is perceived by different people around me. A family member made a comment to me the other day about how well they thought I’d been doing in the last six months. I found it to be such a strange observation, as I felt the last six months had been fairly brutal on my body and mind. Since January I had been in the ER five times, broken three ribs, had one particular episode where I was very close to almost dying, and had sustained a lot of mental stress surrounding my filing for Social Security Disability Benefits. How did that appear as doing well?

I guess it all depends on everyone’s perception of time. For the person who thought I was doing A-OK, well, I guess that was to be expected since they only saw me on my good days. No one wants to visit or support during the bad days, so most of my family and friends only see me on manageable, low-pain days. And if there were more of those days in their memory, then I guess a lot of time had been spent with me on good days. At least they were showing their support, however, by wanting to see me. They may have had a different perception of how I was actually doing, but at least they made time to see me often enough to draw that conclusion.

For my mom, who is my primary caretaker, my time has been marked as not so well. She sees the good, the bad, and the ugly. Now, in saying this I’m not inferring that my last six months has been a torturous journey. I have certainly had my good days, maybe even good weeks. But for us, the time marked is seen through a different pair of lenses. While this part in her life was definitely not chosen, my mom has done extraordinarily well in her role. I may not have even made it through to this time and place if it were not for her. My mom always has time for me. She understands more than anyone what I’m going through and does everything in her power to help and support me.

A friend of mine was recently saddened by a situation involving some of her close friends. It was made known to her, and apparently not in a nice manner, that  her presence was unwanted at a social gathering. Understandably, she was devestated by this. But upon comments from concerned friends, she lamented that while their behaviors were unsatisfactory, the people in question were still her close friends. I understood exactly where she was coming from regarding letting bad behavior slip by when it concerns people your known a long time. While having not dealt with the exact same scenario, I have on many occasions let people walk all over me, or treat me unfairly, only because of our history and the time spent knowing them.

The whole ordeal gave me a lot to think about, and actually plagued me with thoughts on it for a few days. My time, more so now than ever before, is precious. Because of this, I want to surround myself with people who want to spend time with me. Not because they have to, or because they feel obligated, and especially not if they feel guilty. But real time spent because of love, friendship, and support.

My lens, much like an hourglass, views my time like grains of sand, slipping through my fingers at the beach. I see it in front of me, clear as day, and yet there is nothing I can do to stall or slow it. And one day, the sand will all be gone, along with my pain.

 I have an old friend who works extremely long hours, with little to no breaks, and often for weeks at a time without a day off. She is very dedicated to her work, so her full schedule while hard, is not a deterrent. Because of this, and the fact that she travels a lot for work, we rarely see each other, often going months between visits. However, she always commits to making time to see me and catch up whenever she can, sometimes sacrificing her only day off in weeks to drive to my side of the island to take me to lunch. And when I object, which I often do as I’m concerned she doesn’t rest enough, she always tells me that

“You make time for the important people in your life, Christine. Actions speak louder than words.”

I cannot agree more with that statement.

I’ve always been a big ‘people person’. I have a lot of friends, a lot of acquaintances, and I’m constantly meeting new people. And while my disease has changed my life a lot, and I’m unable to make as much time as before to accommodate seeing all my friends, I make a pretty good effort. I’m pretty good at keeping to my social engagements, and even if I’m ill and have to cancel due to a pain flare or last minute doctor’s appointment, I almost always reschedule for the next day or the closest next time available.

I have someone else in my life, whom unfortunately does not make time for me, despite their insistence of how important I am to them. They make plans with me often, and yet there is always a last minute cancellation, with apologies all around, though sometimes there’s no explanation at all. As much as the world is in a rush, there is always time to make a quick call, apologies can take a few sentences at the most. Hell, they can even be texted. Anyone who says they don’t have the time is lying.This person often makes it very clear that I am to drop everything to accomodate them when their schedules clear, however if I ever have a request or an invite, they have no time for me. Frustrating… I can’t stand flakiness..

Actions speak louder than words.

Here’s where marking time becomes important. Whether you’re like me and have a debilitating disease, or you’re a regular Joe Schmo, your time is important. Your life is important. So the people you give your time to are also important. Why do we give our time to so many people who make it clear that it’s not as important as them and theirs? Why are we wasting our efforts on people who don’t return our love and support?

Is it because they’ve been around a long time? Does length of friendship or family history make it ok for others to walk all over us, or hurt our feelings? The answer is no. Family and friendship mean nothing if love and respect don’t go hand in hand.

Time is important no matter where you are in your life journey. We respect time, and in turn we should respect the time of others as well as ourselves. I realize that while my time may be limited, and my life span will unfortunately be cut shorter than others of my generation, my time is still important. So I need to surround myself only with those who want to play an active role in my life. If you truly believe you are an important person in my life, well… Prove it.


 

 

 

Thanks to all those who continue to read my blog and have supported me throughout my journey with Rheumatoid Disease. If you like to help support me on a final basis please visit my page at http://www.gofundme.com/sixthousandsteps

Mahalo

Should I or Shouldn’t I? A Dilemma of My Disease

When I opened my email inbox this morning I had a new article from Psychology Today, an online magazine that I subscribe to. The title of the article was “Should I or Shouldn’t I?” The Dilemmas of Chronic Illness, written by Toni Bernhard, a fellow victim of a chronic disease. The entire article was like an insight into my brain,  basically discussing the day to day difficulty we chronic illness patients go through trying to keep up with the rest of the world. I’ve personally dealt with these questions in my own l life several times, so I’ve taken the same questions Toni addressed personally in her article, and have answered them with my own opinions/feelings here. Perhaps it will provide insight into my life and actions that friends and family have wondered about..

 

Do I accept an invitation from a friend to get together or do I refuse it?

For me, this really depends on how far out the invite was received. If it’s weeks in advance I tend to tell the person that I’m interested in spending time with them, however I don’t know how I’ll feel that day so let’s make the plan tentative. I don’t want to flat out refuse an invite in case that person writes me off, and I don’t receive further invites. But at the same time, I hate being flaky. I would prefer a plan be tentative so if I’m not feeling well it was already suggested that I may not be able to attend. To be clear, I love spending time with family and friends, I just don’t always know how I’m going to feel.

 

Do I tell family and friends how I’m faring with my health or do I keep it to myself?

Sometimes, I feel if I talk about myself I’m worried they are tired of hearing it. My chronic disease is is a large part of my life, so the reality is if someone asks me how I’m doing, they are asking about my health. I worry about sounding like a broken record, but if I don’t talk about it, I’m isolating myself from others. My pain therapist often stresses how important it is to talk with friends and family about what I’m going through so I don’t risk getting depressed or bottling things in. Though, even with his advice, I find myself couching it a lot. Not telling people the true extent of what’s going on because I don’t want to sound like a complainer.

 

Do I try to look my best when I’m around other people or do I let my looks reflect how I’m really feeling?

If I try to look my best, I’m concerned that people will misinterpret the state of my health. I’ve always been really into makeup and fashions, and since becoming sick I don’t have the opportunity to dress up much anymore. So on days where I feel even remotely energized enough to make the effort, I tend to want to put makeup and a cute outfit on. But is this sending a message that I feel totally fine? Because there is never a day or even an hour where I’m not in pain, and or feeling the affects of my disease.

But if I let my looks reflect how I’m feeling, it usually brings my spirits down. I hate leaving the comfort of my home feeling dowdy and unkempt. Sure, I look exactly how I feel, but that means I look like crap. It brings my morale down and opens me up to more unwanted criticism, such as “Wow, you don’t look so good”, or “How come you don’t put some makeup on to hide those dark circles?” Vicious cycle.

 

If a special opportunity arises, do I go beyond what I know my body can  comfortably handle or do I play it safe?

If I participate, I could wind up stressing my body or becoming too exhausted, landing me in bed for days. If I don’t participate, I could be missing out on fun or uplifting life experiences that can keep my morale up.

I was recently invited to a fashion show style event, that some friends were running. It was planned weeks in advance and I was a tentative guest, not knowing how I would feel on the night in question, so I didn’t say yes definitively. I knew the event would be a lot of fun, many of my friends were going, and there was a lot of excitement surrounding it. However, I also knew the event would be a high energy affair, and be a late night. Even throughout the morning of the day of I was on the fence on whether I should go, but leaning towards yes, as I had been feeling quite isolated.  Unfortunately that day I had a lot of doctors appointments as well as clinical testing, and I was exhausted by late afternoon. I knew I could probably take a nap and still really and go to the event if I really wanted to. But knowing me, and knowing my body, it would have been a mistake. One that I may have had to pay for days on end. So I didn’t go. Was I said that I missed a fabulous opportunity to see a great show and socialize with friends I hadn’t seen in awhile? Of course! But health comes first, and I have to trust my instincts.

 

Do I try a new treatment someone is urging on me or do I take a pass?

I’ve talked several times about how often people urge me to try new diet schemes or anti-inflammatory treatments that they swear worked for their best friends hairdresser’s accountant and could for me too. It is very frustrating to have things like that constantly pushed in my face, especially when the person in question isn’t sick themselves or haven’t done the so-called miracle cure diet.

So usually in this case I take everything with a grain of salt. Sometimes I’ll do research of my own, looking through various websites and articles and reviews to see if these treatments really do work. However, I have to constantly remind these people who mean well that just because a treatment or diet plan worked for one person, it doesn’t mean it works for everyone. I mean if that were the case, our country wouldn’t have an obesity epidemic, because everyone would know the one and only diet that works.

I appreciate the sentiment and wanting to help me with my health, and my chronic pain, and my weight gain. But I’d prefer if everyone would just let my doctors do their jobs, and keep the “helpful suggestions” to themselves.

 

Do I pursue a new interest even though it exacerbates my symptoms or do I stick to my old routine?

If I pursue it I could be opening myself up to new interests and entertainments that can enrich my life. It could boost my morale, lower my depression, and have an overall positive impact on my mental health. However, depending on what it is, I could be causing myself more physical pain and exhaustion in the long run. Which in turn means days of bed rest where I’m exacerbating my symptoms, prolonging the pain and denying myself fresh air and movement.

If I choose not to pursue it then I could be cutting myself off from a healthy lifestyle change, that could be good for me long term. I’d also be passing up the chance to focus on something other than my health for a change, which in turn raises morale. It’s a slippery slope.

A great example of this is my adult coloring. Last year I was introduced to the now very popular phenomena of adult coloring. They now make hundreds of beautiful coloring books for adults with intricate pages of all sorts of designs. I lean towards the paisley and mandala varieties. I started out slowly, with just one book and a small box of colored pencils. But I loved it! And started doing it more and more, obtaining more books, a larger pencil set, and electric sharpener. I now have a coloring box that sits next to my couch, filled with 5 books of different designs, two boxes filled with a variety of colors, and two binders filled with completed pages. The coloring, while a great distraction from my disease, also calms me and is very therapeutic.

However, there is a downside. I have a chronic pain disease that mainly affects my hands and feet. And after an hour or so, my hands get too cramped to color anymore. But I love my hobby so much that sometimes I ignore the pain and discomfort and push through until I literally can’t move my fingers anymore, and blisters have formed at my knuckles. Every time I do this I know I should stop and just color another day. But my ocd pushes me to finish the page, and it’s so nice to do something so enjoyable.

I guess it’s different for everyone. But I’ll admit that I do cause some of the pain I contend with myself, just so that I may enjoy some creature comforts.

 

I understand that everyone deals with their disease differently, some things being harder than others, and it can be a challenge. Life is a challenge. I know that I just have to take one day at a time, step by step, and that I’ll find my footing and my path eventually.

 

If you’d like to help support me in my path and journey please visit my website here. Thank you for reading and sharing me experiences.

I am blessed

I am blessed by the kindness of others.

I am blessed by my best friend Dustin, who selflessly bought me an airline ticket to come visit him because I couldn’t afford to attend his wedding.

I am blessed by my friend Bergy, who contacts me daily to see how I am, or if I need anything, and whom spends time with me every weekend and makes sure she gets me out of the house.

I am blessed by my surrogate aunt, Janey, whom even after many years of not living in California, still makes time to see me when I’m in town, and keeps in contact with me often to make sure I am doing well.

I am blessed by my dear friend Catherine, who’s infinite wisdom and love never leaves me, but protects me like a nice warm blanket of support and kindness.

I am blessed by my new friend Lester, whom upon reading my blog and having it speak to him treated my mom and I to a wonderfully decadent meal as a way of showing support.

I am blessed by the people who’ve donated to my cause out of the kindness of their hearts.

I am blessed by my cats whom show me never-ending love and kindness that cannot be equaled anywhere or by anything.

I am blessed by my mother who never makes an excuse when it comes to my health, and sits with me during doctors appointments and infusions.

I am blessed by the people who show me support, love, kindness.

I am blessed.

Please visit my campaign page if you would to show your support by helping me pay rent on my donation-paid apartment…

Christine Lilley’s Life Fund